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san diego, ca

Designer of high end fragrances and body care products in the San Diego area using natural ingredients. Specializing in soap and ritual products. 

Journal

This journal is about all of the things that inspire me to keep making my bath and beauty products; including but not limited to books, herbs, plants, places, art and music.

Salt, Water, and Ritual Bathing

Luna Apotheca

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What do you do when you are out of sync and everything seems to be going wrong?

Perhaps you clutch a lucky object to your chest (a crystal, stone, or other talisman) or maybe you take part in a ritual bath that wards off evil and bad luck. Throughout history and among many cultures there are two ingredients that are believed to heal and cleanse both spiritually and physically: water and salt.

I would like to talk a little about these two common yet powerful ingredients and how Luna Apotheca uses them to create our own special blend of Ritual Bathing Magick. 

Salt - One of the only rocks both humans and animals eat

From the ancient Egyptians use in mummification to the Catholic Church's holy water (blessed salt water), salt is an important ingredient to a spiritual connection with the divine. I recently read Salt, A World History by Mark Kurlansky in which he talks about the history of the first salt mines to the economic impact this savory treat has on the world. The human body contains salt, "which is a necessary component in the functioning of cells. Without both water and salt, cells could not get nourishment and would die of dehydration." We'll get to a discussion on water magick later, but salt is believed to protect against decay, sustain life, and possess truth and wisdom. Every "How to be a Witch Book" worth its weight in salt mentions how to use salt magically.

The debate is still on as to why humankind believes in this divine connection but the almost universal agreement is that one does exist. Perhaps its our primitive knowledge that salt does in-fact guard against decay and rot. Everything from meat to grain was salted in order to preserve and protect food sources. Maybe its a nod to the fact we are born from a womb that cradled us in salt water.

There are many ways to use salt for spiritual cleansing. Left out in a bowl in the middle of the room it has as much power in cleansing negative energy away as smoking or censing a room does. It can be put in water and sprinkled about a room in a protection spell or put in a ritual bath for the same effect. Although traditionally used on a witches altar to represent the earth element, Luna Apotheca uses sea salt as a way to harness the power of the sea, and rock salt as a way to draw on the energy of the mountains and earth.

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Water and a bathtub full of magick 

Spiritual bathing is an ancient practice that dates back to many different cultural traditions. Greeks and Romans were famous for the healing properties of their bathhouses and a river's edge is where Buddha sat and attained enlightenment. Bathing not only cleanses you from the day-to-day grind, but when used with intention acts as an important aspect in the healing process. Used symbolically in ritual, it can represent rebirth and change, used before a ceremony or circle to draw in the divine, and like a potion filled cauldron, it is where transformations occur. 

Luna Apotheca uses sea salt, rock salt, and epsom salt (not a real salt, but still has great ritual bathing uses) in many of our sacred bathing products. Soon to be released is our Queen's of Tarot (Reversed) Bathing Salts, which uses all 4 elements to help you see beyond the confines of your conscious mind and seek out all the secrets of the subconscious.

Check out our Etsy site to see and read about our other bath and beauty ritual products. 

Bibliography and Further Reading
The Fragrant Heavens, by Valerie Ann Worwood
Spiritual Bathing, by Rosita Arvigo and Nadine Epstein
Salt, A World History, by Mark Kurlansky